Maxwell Smart

Copyright 2012, Scott D. Murdock


I hadn't visited Maxwell AFB in several years, so I jumped at the chance to attend a work-related class there.  I opted to drive, of course, so I could do some sightseeing along the way.

Thursday, 11 Oct 2012

With the Outback loaded, the first day was a push from Denver to the far side of Kansas.  A stop at Forbes AFB KS was cut short by a thunderstorm--I photographed one hangar before the rain poured down.

Forbes AFB KS (1091, GUQE)  Located at 38-56-50, 95-40-00, this is now Forbes Field Airport (FOE).  This was Topeka AAFld during WWII, a 2AF base also known as Pauline Aifield.  During W.W.II the Topeka airport was improved under the Development of Landing Areas for National Defense (DLAND) program.  After the war the field transitioned to Air Transport Command, and on 1 Jan 1948 it was redesignated Topeka Air Force Base.  The base transferred to Strategic Air Command (SAC) in that same year, and was redesignated Forbes Air Force Base on 10 June 1949.  The base transferred from SAC to TAC on 1 July 1965.  Forbes AFB closed in the late 1970s, with much of the installation becoming Forbes Field ANG Base, which is still active today.
(World War II hangar)

I stopped in Olathe, Kansas, for the night.  This was the long day of the trip, at 625 miles.

Friday, 12 Oct 2012

From Olathe, I motored east for a full day of exploring in Missouri.

Whiteman AF Msl Site M-01 MO (9745, YWPZ)  This Minuteman II Launch Control Facility (LCF) was designated and assigned 7 June 1963, transferred from SAC to Air Combat Command (ACC) on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 26 July 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site L-01 MO (9744, YWPM)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 23 August 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 14 March 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site K-01 MO (9305, YWNW )  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 30 January 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 6 November 2001.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)
(Gate)

(Launch Control Building (LCB))

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(Hard Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) antenna)

(Hard High Frequency (HF) transmit antenna)

(Air intake/exhaust shafts)

(Air intake/exhaust shafts)

(Air intake/exhaust shafts)

(Concrete feature)

(Concrete feature)

(Cable marker)

(Cable marker)

(Cable marker)

Whiteman AF Msl Site G-01 MO (9279, YWLU)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 13 February 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 20 May 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(Concrete feature)

(Air intake/exhaust shafts)

(Hard HF receive antenna)

(Hard UHF antenna)

(Hard HF transmit antenna)

Whiteman AF Msl Site J-01 MO (9299, YWND)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 14 November 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, and declared excess on 16 June 1999.
(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site H-01 MO (9285, YWMF)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 23 January 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 29 April 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(Hard UHF antenna)
(Air intake or exhaust shaft)

Whiteman AF Msl Site F-01 MO (8204, YWLH)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 28 March 1962, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 20 May 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site E-01 MO (9261, YWKW)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 23 January 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 23 May 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site D-01 MO (9252, YWKK)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 23 September 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 8 October 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(Hard UHF antenna)

(Fence)

(Concrete feature)

(Concrete feature)

Whiteman AF Msl Site G-10 MO (9283, YWMD)  This Minuteman II Launch Facility (LF) was designated and assigned 30 January 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, declared excess on 16 June 1999, and disposed of on 28 October 2002.
(General view)

(General view)

Whiteman AF Msl Site J-07 MO (9301, YWNK)  This Minuteman II LF was designated and assigned 19 March 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, and declared excess on 16 June 1999.
(General view)

(General view)

(Gate with sign)

I stopped in Jeferson City, Missouri for the night. This day covered 428 miles.

Saturday, 13 Oct 2012

Getting an early start in Jefferson City, I drove through Missouri toward Tennessee.

Harvey Parks Airport MO  Located at 36-53-40, 89-33-40, this is now Sikeston Memorial Municipal Airport (SIK).  During W.W.II this was an Army Air Forces (AAF) contract pilot school operated by Missouri Institute of Aeronautics, Inc.  The school at Harvey Parks Airport opened 14 September 1940, and operated until late 1944.  During the war, the property was purchased from the contractor (who continued to operate the school for the AAF) by the Defense Plant Corporation (DPC).
(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar interior)

(Hangar detail)

Dyersburg AAFld TN  Located at 35-54-00, 89-24-10, this is now Arnold Field Airport (M31).  During W.W.II the Dyersburg airport was improved under the DLAND program. It was used by 2AF during the war, then briefly by 3AF before inactivation on 15 October 1945.  It was briefly held by SAC, then TAC, in 1946, before it was excessed in 1947.
(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Newer building on old hangar foundation)

(Norden bombsight storage and maintenance building, minus outer wooden structure)

(Norden bombsight storage and maintenance building, minus outer wooden structure)

(Norden bombsight storage and maintenance building, minus outer wooden structure)

(Building)

(Building)

(Vault)

(Vault)

(Vault)

(Chimney)

(Foundation)

Eaker AFB AR (2147, BWKR)  Located at 35-57-30, 89-56-40, this is now Arkansas International Airport (BYH).  Construction of Blytheville AAFld began 10 May 1942, and a pilot school opened 7 August of that year. The base was inactivated on 30 November 1945, and was briefly held by SAC and then TAC before being disposed of on 15 August 1946. It was returned to USAF service in an inactive status, and redesignated Blytheville AFB, on 10 June 1953.  It was activated 18 August 1955, under TAC, and transferred to SAC on 1 April 1958.  It transferred to ACC on 1 June 1992, just prior to inactivation on 15 December 1992.
(SAC alert area general view)
(SAC alert area entrance)

(SAC alert area entrance)

(SAC alert area entrance)

(SAC alert area entrance)

(SAC 70-man "molehole" readiness crew building)

(SAC 70-man "molehole" readiness crew building)

(SAC alert area sentry tower)

(SAC alert area sentry tower)
(SAC alert area building)

(SAC alert area facility 1249 power plant)

(SAC alert area facility 1249 power plant)

(Facility 222)

(Hangar)

(Control tower)

(Hound Dog/Quail missile service shop)

(Hound Dog/Quail missile service shop)

(Hound Dog missile engine test cell)

(Hound Dog missile engine test cell)

(Hound Dog missile run-up shop)

(Hound Dog missile run-up shop)

(Jet engine test cell)

(Jet engine test cell)

(Jet engine test cell)

(Fuel systems maintenance hangar)

(Fuel systems maintenance hangar)

(Fuel systems maintenance hangar)

(Maintenance dock)

(Maintenance dock)

(World War II hangar)

(Dormitory, three-story)

(Dormitory, two-story)

(Facility 130)

(Building)
(Building)

I settled into a hotel in Memphis, Tennessee, after 524 miles of driving.

Sunday, 14 Oct 2012

From Memphis I had a 343 mile drive to Montgomery, Alabama, and Maxwell AFB (1362, PNQS). I would attend school on Maxwell for the next 2 1/2 weeks. This leg of the journey was 1,920 miles. While I was at Maxwell, my weekday evenings were spent at the Air University Library. Although most of the library is closed for renovation, the Authority Collection was still available. This allowed me to tap into War Department general orders from the 1920s through World War II.

Saturday, 20 Oct 2012

A weekend road trip seemed in order, so I packed up and explored Alabama and Georgia.

Eufaula AFS AL (3305, GFKD)  This Air Defense Command (ADC) radar site, at 31-52-52, 85-15-14, was also known as site TM-199 and Z-199. It was activated 31 July 1958, inactivated 1 July 1968, and disposed of 9 April 1971.
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)
(Operations building, power plant, and AN/FPS-24 radar building (left to right))

(Operations building)
(Operations building)
(Power plant)

(Building)
(Gate)

Eufaula Communications Annex AL (7802)  This ADC communications annex, a Ground-to-Air Transmit and Receive (GATR) facility, served nearby Eufaula AFS.  Due to locked gates and dense trees, I did not observe the site directly.

Souther Field GA  Located at 32-06-45, 84-11-20, this is now Jimmy Carter Regional Airport (ACJ).  Souther Field had its aviation start as a training field in World War I.  It served as a civilian airport between wars, then for World War II it was an AAF contract flying school (first elementary, later primary) operated by the Graham Aviation Company.  During the war, the airport was improved under the DLAND program.  Also during World War II, the property was purchased by the DPC and known to that agency as Plancor 607 (the 607 designation also applied to the three auxiliary fields). 
(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar)
(Hangar, heavily modified)

(Hangar, heavily modified)

(Elevated water storage tank)

(Elevated water storage tank)

Bridgeboro GFA GA (5868, CJCY)  This ADC gap filler radar site, at 31-25-31, 83-57-07, was also known as site TM-199B and Z-199B when supporting Eufaula AFS AL, from October 1959 until 1968.  Then, from 1968 until July 1970, it was known as Z-200B while supporting Cross City AFS FL.  My thanks to Tom Page of radomes.org for sorting out the redesignation.
(General view)

(Building)

(Top of tower)

Moultrie AAFld GA  Located at 31-05-00, 83-48-20, this is now Moultrie Municipal Airport (MGR).  During W.W.II the Moultrie airport was improved under the DLAND program.  A training command base, it served from 1941 to 1945 as an auxiliary of nearby Spence Field.
(Ceilometer)

(Very High Frequency Omnirange (VOR))

(Wind Tetrahedron)

Thomasville AAFld GA  Located at 30-54-10, 83-52-50, this is now Thomasville Regional Airport (TVI).  This was a 3AF airfield during W.W.II, and it was improved under the DLAND program.  I did not observe any buildings or structures from the wartime days.

My overnight stop was Thomasville, Georgia. Miles on this day were 326.

Sunday, 21 Oct 2012

From Thomasville, I worked my way into Florida then back to Alabama.

Moultrie National Guard Armory GA  A classic design, probably built in the 1950s, this armory had recently been disposed of when I saw it.  Located at 31-11-16, 83-44-59.
(Building)

(Building)

Spence Air Base GA (2423, VYUK)  Located at 31-08-25, 83-42-25, this is now Spence Airport (MUL).  Construction of Spence Field began in 1941, and the AAF pilot school opened on 30 March 1942.  It was inactivated in late 1945, and disposed of in 1946.  Spence Air Base served again as a contract flying school, reactivated on 16 April 1951 with Hawethorne School of Aeronautics as the contractor. This continued until 1960, and in 1961 the base was activated yet again, this time as Spence AF Auxiliary Field supporting Moody AFB GA.  (I've called the two hangars "east" and "west" just to tell them apart.)
(General view)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, west)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, west)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, west)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, west)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, east)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, east)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, east)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, east)
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, east)

(Both 184-foot demountable hangars type DH-1)

(Airfield ramp)

(Control tower)

(Control tower)

(Water system building, control tower)

(Water system building, control tower)

(Elevated water storage tank)

(Elevated water storage tank)

(Elevated water storage tank, partially underground water reservoir)

Graham Air Base FL  Located at 30-50-05, 85-11-00, this is now Marianna Municipal Airport (MAI).  The AAF pilot school at Marianna AAFld opened in August 1942.  In the last year of W.W.II the field changed hands several times, from Eastern Flying Traiing Command to 3AF, to 1AF; then briefly, SAC, and ADC.  It was reactivated under Air Training Command as Graham Air Base, a contract primary pilot school, from approximately 1954 to 1960.
(Main gate)

(Main gate)
(Airfield ramp)

(Airfield ramp)
(Water storage tank)

(Operations building and control tower)

(Operations building and control tower)

(Operations building and control tower)

(OIperations building and control tower)

(Building)

(Building)

(Building)

(Building)

(Building)

Napier Field AL  Located at 31-19-20, 85-27-15, this is now Dothan Regional Airport (DHN).  The AAF pilot school at Napier Field opened 20 December 1941, and operated until 1945. The large hangar is interesting; it appears to be a mashup of multiple 184-foot demountable hangars.
(General view)
(Hangar)
(Hangar)
(Hangar)
(Elevated water storage tank)
(Elevated water storage tank)
(Water systems buildings)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)

Troy Municipal Airport AL  Located at 31-51-40, 86-00-40, this is now Troy Municipal Airport (TOI).  This airfield served late in W.W.II, as an auxiliary field to Maxwell Field in 1944 and early 1945, then as an auxiliary to Tuskegee AAFld during 1945.
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, interior)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1, detail)

I returned to Maxwell AFB after covering 324 miles, making the weekend total 650 miles.

Saturday, 27 Oct 2012

By this time I had caught quite an annoying cold, so I didn't do much on this weekend.

Moton Field KS  Located at 32-27-35, 85-40-45, this is now Moton Field Municipal Airport (06A).  Operated by Tuskegee Institute, Moton Field provided contract pilot training (elementary, later primary) during W.W.II.  It was paired with nearby Tuskegee AAFld to provide the full course of training for black pilots.  I enjoyed touring the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, and I hope to return after they have completed construction (one hangar was open with displays, the second hangar is still being prepared with displays). 
(General view)

(General view)
(General view)
(Main gate)

(Main gate)

(Hangar 1 interior)

(Hangar 1 interior)

(Hangar 1 interior)

(Hangar 1 interior)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 1)

(Hangar 2)

(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Hangar 2)
(Fire protection shed)

(Warehouse/vehicle storage)

(Dope storage shed)

(Bath and locker house)

(Oil storage shed)

(Building)

Dannelly Field AL (7580, FAKZ)  Located at 32-18-05, 86-23-30, this is now Montgomery Regional Airport (Dannelly Field) (MGM).  During W.W.II this airport was known as Montgomery Municipal Airport #2 and also as Dannelly Field.  It served as auxiliary field #6 to Gunter Field, and it was improved under the DLAND program.  AAF use ended in 1945, and the lease was cancelled in 1946.  In 1954, Dannelly Field started serving as an ANG airfield, and this use continues to the present on a portion of the airport.
(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

(184-foot demountable hangar type DH-1)

I drove a mere 131 miles on this day.

Wednesday-Thursday, 31 Oct-1 Nov 2012

My thanks to the staff at the Air Force Historical Research Agency. I greatly appreciated their friendly and fast service, allowing me to research a variety of documents on short notice.

Friday, 2 Nov 2012

My sweetie Debbie flew down from Denver so that we could enjoy the drive home together. This first day, we made it 525 miles to Chester, Illinois.

Saturday, 3 Nov 2012

We made an early start from Chester and drove into Missouri.

Whiteman AF Msl Site C-01 MO (9246, YWJY)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 13 September 1963, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, and declared excess on 16 June 1999.
(General view)

(General view)

(Gate and sign)

Whiteman AF Msl Site A-01 MO (8740, YWJA)  This Minuteman II LCF was designated and assigned 21 November 1962, transferred from SAC to ACC on 1 June 1992, and declared excess on 16 June 1999.
(General view)

(General view)
(General view)
(Gate)

(Gate)
(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(LCB)

(Air intake/exhaust shafts)

(Hard UHF antenna)

(Hard HF receive antenna)

(Hard HF receive antenna)

(Hard HF receive antenna)

(Concrete feature)

(Concrete feature)

We settled into a motel in Salina, Kansas, after 571 miles of driving.

Sunday, 4 Nov 2012

We pointed the car toward home and drove 449 miles to Denver. This made the return trip 1,545 miles. The entire adventure covered 4,374 miles--the longest road trip I've ever made.


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