Barksdale AFB Off-Base Sites

  Copyright  1998, Scott D. Murdock


  CONTENTS  

Introduction
Auxiliary Fields
Barksdale Defense Area Nike Missile Sites
Bombing Ranges
Communications and Navigation Aid Sites
Miscellaneous
References

 


  INTRODUCTION

Air Force installations, such as Barksdale Air Force Base (AFB), tend to control various off-base sites. Like the ships supporting an aircraft carrier, these sites provide diverse operational, logistical, administrative, or protective functions to the main base. Sometimes, detached sites support an entirely different mission and merely rely on a convenient main base for support. These sites are often small, and may have short lives; they may be relatively unknown, except to those who visit them in the course of their duties. History may view them as insignificant compared to the larger installations.

This monograph provides an inventory of Barksdale AFB’s off-base sites, offers an understanding of their purposes. The reader should already have a general knowledge of Barksdale AFB history, including command assignments and missions; and should be familiar with Air Force real property concepts and terminology. For the convenience of other researchers, I have included latitude and longitude coordinates when possible, either taken from maps and layout drawings, or taken myself in the field. If you do visit these former installations, please respect the current property owners’ rights. Better to view the site from a distance than to be arrested (or worse) for trespassing.

Thanks to the Engineering Flight at Barksdale AFB for allowing me to view their fine collection of historic layout drawings. Thanks to Mr. Harold "Buck" Rigg, 8th Air Force Museum, for his ongoing encouragement and access to museum archival documents. Thanks to Lt Col Bill Shield (USAF Ret.) whose inquiry sparked me to complete this project after putting it off for too long. And special thanks to my wife, Nancy, for putting up with my somewhat unusual hobby.

Certainly, I have not uncovered the complete picture. If Murphy’s Law is working, I will find some new information as soon as I print this edition! I welcome additions, corrections, or comments. I would like to produce a more comprehensive second edition, as more information comes to light.
 


  AUXILIARY FIELDS

Goodwin Air Force Auxiliary Field, Eldorado, Arkansas
(33-13-15 N latitude, 92-48-30 W longitude)

Flying Division, Air Training Command recommended to Air Training Command early in 1948 that "Eldorado-Goodwin Field" be leased as an auxiliary field for Barksdale (ATC, 1948, July 1). Under the name "Goodwin Airfield," it was gained by Air Training Command as an auxiliary to Barksdale on March 15, 1948 (ATC Index). It was listed in the April 1, 1948 and July 1, 1948 editions of the USAF Installations Directory as "El Dorado Municipal Airport" and "El Dorado, Goodwin Airport," respectively, a non-military airport available for use by military aircraft (HAF, 1948, April 1; HAF, 1948, July 1). "Goodwin Auxiliary Field" was redesignated "Goodwin Air Force Auxiliary Field" on January 13, 1948 by Department of the Air Force (DAF) General Order (GO) 42, June 23, 1949, as amended by DAF GO 54, July 28, 1949. The lease on "Goodwin AF Auxiliary Field" was cancelled at an unknown date (ATC Index). "Goodwin Field" is listed in the October 1, 1948 and January 1, 1949 USAF Installations Directories. The "Goodwin AF Aux Fld" is listed in USAF Installations Directories dated April 1, 1949 and July 1949. In October 1949 it is listed as "Goodwin Field"; it is not listed in the January 1950 directory (HAF, 1948, October 1; HAF, 1949, January 1; HAF, 1949, April 1; HAF, 1949, July; HAF, 1949, October; HAF, 1950, January). Another source says "Goodwin Air Field" was leased then activated March 15, 1948, then the lease canceled and returned to owner on October 1, 1949 (HQ AETC, 1993). In the October 1949 directory, Major Command of assignment had changed from ATC to Strategic Air Command (SAC) (HAF, 1949, October). This is now South Arkansas Regional/Goodwin (ELD). No obvious traces of Air Force use remain (Personal visit, 1995).

Gregg County Airport, Longview, Texas
(32-23 N latitude, 94-43 W longitude)

This was apparently sought as an auxiliary for Barksdale but never acquired. Air Training Command listed it as a property to be acquired, date unknown (ATC Index). Flying Division, Training Command requested it as an auxiliary for Barksdale Field in November 1946 (ATC, 1947, April 1). I have found no evidence it was ever used as such. This is now Gregg County Airport (GGG), with no obvious traces of Air Force use (Personal visit, 1995).

Mansfield Army Air Field/De Soto Parish Air Force Auxiliary Field, Mansfield, Louisiana
(32-05 N latitude, 93-46 W longitude)
This airfield was first listed as an auxiliary field to Barksdale Field in the February 1, 1943 Army Air Forces (AAF) Station List (AAF, 1943, February 1). In May 1943 it was still listed as a Barksdale Field auxiliary, as both "Mansfield AAF" (AAF for Army Air Field) and "Mansfield MAP" (MAP for Municipal Airport) (AAF, 1943, May 1). It is listed as "Mansfield Airfield" in the November 4, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, November 4), still as a Barksdale Field auxiliary field. I do not find it in any World War II listings after this time. In May 1946 it was secured for joint use as an auxiliary to Barksdale Field, under the name "De Soto Parish Airport" (ATC, 1947, April 1). On January 13, 1948 it was redesignated "De Soto Parish Air Force Auxiliary Field" by DAF GO 2, same date. Under that name, and consisting of 1045 acres, it lists as an auxiliary to Barksdale AFB until at least June, 1952 (HAF, 1948, April 1; HAF, 1948, July 1; HAF, 1948, October 1; HAF, 1949, January 1; HAF, 1949, April 1; HAF, 1949, July; HAF, 1949, October; HAF, 1950, January; HAF, 1950, June; HAF, 1952, June). A conflicting official source indicates "DeSoto Parish Airport" was leased then activated on June 3, 1946; and the lease canceled and returned to owner October 1, 1949 (HQ AETC, 1993). A T-33 aircraft serves as a "gate guard" to what is now the De Soto Parish Airport (3F3) (Personal visit, 1994).

Matagorda Island Air Force Range, Matagorda Island, Texas
(28-19-30 N latitude, 96-27-50 W longitude)
This airfield on Matagorda Island supported a complex of bombing ranges on the island, off the coast of Texas near Port O'Connor. "Matagorda Island Air Force Range" was transferred from either Bergstrom AFB, Texas, or Carswell AFB, Texas to Barksdale on April 1, 1971. Mueller (1989) lists both of those Texas bases as the prior "owner" and I have not found another source to confirm the correct assignment. The same reference gives an inactivation date of June 30, 1975. It is still listed as "Matagorda Island Air Force Range," Installation Location Code (ILC) "PLPL," in the December 15, 1975 USAF Installations Directory (DAF, 1975, December 15). The airfield now sits abandoned on Matagorda Island State Park and Wildlife Management Area, and can be reached only by boat. The runways and taxiways are unused and crumbling; many buildings are gone but some remain in use by the park staff (Personal visit, 1994).

Shreveport Municipal Airport, Shreveport, Louisiana
(32-32-30 N latitude, 93-44-45 W longitude)
"Shreveport MAP" (MAP stands for Municipal Airport) is listed as an auxiliary field to Barksdale Field in the October 7, 1942 through May 1, 1943 AAF Station Lists (AAF, 1942, October 7; AAF, 1942, December 1; AAF, 1943, February 1; AAF, 1943, May 1). Photos and information on display at this airport indicate a World War II Naval presence but do not hint at any Army Air Forces use (Personal visit, 1994). This is now the Shreveport Downtown Airport (DTN). 


  BARKSDALE DEFENSE AREA NIKE SITES

Barksdale Defense Area Site BD-10, Bellevue, Louisiana
(32-40-20 N latitude, 93-31-18 W longitude) BD-10C
(32-40-28 N latitude, 93-30-35 W longitude) BD-10L
This complex is located in Bellevue, northeast of Barksdale AFB, on Bodcau Dam Road. While not under the control of Barksdale AFB, this installation was built to protect SAC operations at Barksdale. It was home to U.S. Army Nike Hercules units from November 1961 to March 1966. It actually consisted of two separate installations. The control site (BD-10C) housed radar towers, headquarters and administration buildings, and barracks. The launcher site (BD-10L) had the launcher bays, missile fueling area, and missile storage (Morgan & Berhow, 1996). The facility is now the Bossier Parish Community College Criminal Justice Center. The former control site houses academic facilities, offices, dining hall, and dormitories. The only radar tower left standing, a 40-foot metal tower, is used for rappelling practice. The launcher site is used for weapons training. Part of the berm surrounding the warhead assembly area is a backstop for a conventional firing range; the warheading building itself is used to practice tactical entry procedures. Two of the three aboveground magazines were converted into ponds, for catfish farming, many years ago. The third magazine is fairly intact; its two bays used for tactical weapons ranges (Personal visit, 1998). To find this site, drive east on Hwy 80 past the Louisiana Downs racetrack to Hwy 157. Turn left, and after driving north several miles turn right (east) on Bodcau Dam Road. The control site will be on the right; continue further down Bodcau Dam Road and the launcher site will be on your right. A tall antenna on the western portion of the former launcher site serves as a convenient landmark (Personal flyover, 1996).

Barksdale Defense Area Site BD-50, Stonewall, Louisiana
(32-18-08 N latitude, 93-47-03 W longitude) BD-50C
(32-17-37 N latitude, 93-47-16 W longitude) BD-50L
This complex is located to the southwest of Barksdale AFB, northeast of Stonewall. It is also composed of two separate parcels of land (personal visit, 1995). This installation was built to protect SAC operations at Barksdale. It was used by Nike Hercules units from November 1961 to March 1966, the same time frame as site BD-10 (Morgan & Berhow, 1996). Louisiana State University uses the former control site (BD-50C) for animal research; I believe they also own the launcher site (BD-50L) although it is unmarked and appears abandoned when viewed from the road. To find this site, take Hwy 171 south from Shreveport to the town of Stonewall. At Stonewall, drive east on Stonewall-Frierson Road. Turn left on Missile Base Road. The road will turn to the right then back to the left; at that point glance to your right to see the launcher area. Continue on Missile Base Road through a right turn to the launcher site entrance. At this point the road turns left and the name changes to Keithville Kingston Road. Follow it north about mile, and you will find the control site on your left (Personal visit, 1996). 


  BOMBING RANGES

Claiborne Air Force Range, Louisiana
(31-06 N latitude, 92-34 W longitude)
This bombing and gunnery range was supported by England AFB, LA for many years prior to that base’s closure. "Claiborne Air Force Range," ILC "ERNM," was transferred to the Air Force Reserves on October 1, 1992 by DAF SO GA-496 dated December 21, 1992 with logistical support to be provided by Barksdale AFB. It is in active use by A-10 aircraft of the 917th Wing (AFRES) at Barksdale (Personal observation, 1996).

Kisatchie Precision Bombing Range #1, Louisiana
(32-07 N latitude, 92-51 W longitude--approximate)
The "Kisatchie Bmbg Rg #1," with one "E-1 SBS Device" was northwest of Winnfield, as shown on a 1945 map (U.S. Engineer Office, 1945, June). The Sonic Bomb Scoring device allowed verification of practice bomb hits by acoustic sensors. A 1945 directory lists "Kisatchie #1 PBR" as 600 acres in size (AAF, 1945, September 1). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Kisatchie Precision Bombing Range #2, Louisiana
(32-03 N latitude, 92-58 W longitude--approximate)
The "Kisatchie Bmbg Rg #1," with one "E-1 SBS Device" was northwest of Winnfield, as shown on a 1945 map (U.S. Engineer Office, 1945, June). The Sonic Bomb Scoring device allowed verification of practice bomb hits by acoustic sensors. A 1945 directory lists "Barksdale #2 PBR" as 600 acres in size (AAF, 1945, September 1). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Kisatchie Precision Bombing Range #3, Louisiana
(31-55 N latitude, 92-48 W longitude--approximate)
The "Kisatchie Bmbg Rg #1," with one "E-1 SBS Device" was northwest of Winnfield, as shown on a 1945 map (U.S. Engineer Office, 1945, June). The Sonic Bomb Scoring device allowed verification of practice bomb hits by acoustic sensors. A 1945 directory lists "Barksdale #3 PBR" as 600 acres in size (AAF, 1945, September 1). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Kisatchie Tent Camp, Louisiana
(31-58 N latitude, 92-47 W longitude--approximate)
"Kisatchie Tent Camp" was gained by the Western Flying Training Command on November 30, 1945 (ATC Index). It is listed as temporarily inactive in late 1946 (ATC, 1947, April 1). It was declared surplus to ATC on April 11, 1947 and surplus to the Army Air Forces on September 12, 1947, and was transferred from ATC to SAC on October 1, 1949 (ATC Index). Given its location near the Kisatchie ranges, it was probably used to support them. The former tent camp is in the Kisatchie National Forest. Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Minden Precision Bombing Range #1, Minden, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet determined)
Located north of Minden in the Kisatchie National Forest, these Barksdale Field bombing ranges were listed collectively as "Minden (Local Bombing Range)" in the May 1, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, May 1). The "Minden PBR" (PBR for Precision Bombing Range) is listed in the August 1, 1944 AAF Installations Directory as being approximately 2.7 square miles in size (AAF, 1944, August 1). "Minden PBR (Site 1)" reverted to the Department of Agriculture on November 9, 1945 (ATC Index). "Minden P.B. Range #1" was listed as temporarily inactive in late 1946 (ATC, 1947, April 1). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Minden Precision Bombing Range #2, Minden, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet determined)
Located north of Minden in the Kisatchie National Forest, these Barksdale Field bombing ranges were listed collectively as "Minden (Local Bombing Range)" in the May 1, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, May 1). The "Minden PBR" (PBR for Precision Bombing Range) is listed in the August 1, 1944 AAF Installations Directory as being approximately 2.7 square miles in size (AAF, 1944, August 1). "Minden PBR (Site 2) reverted to the Department of Agriculture on November 9, 1945 (ATC Index). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Minden Precision Bombing Range #3, Minden, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet determined)
Located north of Minden in the Kisatchie National Forest, these Barksdale Field bombing ranges were listed collectively as "Minden (Local Bombing Range)" in the May 1, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, May 1). The "Minden PBR" (PBR for Precision Bombing Range) is listed in the August 1, 1944 AAF Installations Directory as being approximately 2.7 square miles in size (AAF, 1944, August 1). "Minden PBR (Site 3)" reverted to the Department of Agriculture on November 9, 1945 (ATC Index). Exact location, current condition, and current use are unknown.

Minden Precision Bombing Range #4, Minden, Louisiana
(32-43 N latitude, 93-15 W longitude)
Located north of Minden in the Kisatchie National Forest, these Barksdale Field bombing ranges were listed collectively as "Minden (Local Bombing Range)" in the May 1, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, May 1). The "Minden PBR" (PBR for Precision Bombing Range) is listed in the August 1, 1944 AAF Installations Directory as being approximately 2.7 square miles in size (AAF, 1944, August 1). "Minden Bombing Range No. 4" appears on a 1945 map of Barksdale (WD, 1945, February 26). "Minden PBR (Site 4) reverted to the Department of Agriculture on November 9, 1945 (ATC Index). No trace of this range is visible from the air today (Personal overflight, 1996).

Minden Precision Bombing Range #5, Minden, Louisiana
(32-43 N latitude, 93-18 W longitude)
Located north of Minden in the Kisatchie National Forest, these Barksdale Field bombing ranges were listed collectively as "Minden (Local Bombing Range)" in the May 1, 1943 AAF Station List (AAF, 1943, May 1). The "Minden PBR" (PBR for Precision Bombing Range) is listed in the August 1, 1944 AAF Installations Directory as being approximately 2.7 square miles in size (AAF, 1944, August 1). "Minden Bombing Range No. 5" appears on a 1945 map of Barksdale (WD, 1945, February 26). "Minden PBR (Site 5)" reverted to the Department of Agriculture on January 21, 1946 (ATC Index). A 1945 map shows this as "Minden Bombing Range" with sonic bomb scoring equipment (U.S. Engineer Office, 1945, June). A 1945 directory lists this range as "Minden PBR," 131 acres in size (AAF, 1945, September 1). No trace of this range is visible from the air today (Personal overflight, 1996).

Peason Ridge Bombing Range, Louisiana
(31-22-15 N latitude, 93-17 W longitude)
A SAC layout drawing dated 1954, and maintained by Barksdale’s engineering flight, shows "Layout of Bombing Range, Peason Ridge" on this former Army artillery range (SAC, 1954, October 21). I have found no other documentation linking this range to Barksdale AFB or the USAF. This site is active as the U.S. Army’s Peason Ridge Training Area, an off-base site of Fort Polk, Louisiana, under the Joint Readiness Training Center (Personal visit, 1996).


  COMMUNICATIONS AND NAVIGATION AID SITES

Barksdale Communications Annex, Daingerfield, Texas
(33-06-20 N latitude, 94-39-30 W longitude)
Acquisition for "Barksdale Communications Annex" was authorized on July 13, 1965 (DA, 1965, July 20). It was assigned to Barksdale AFB on September 24, 1965 and declared excess on December 22 of that year (Mueller, 1982). Part of the site was leased (277.8 acres), and those leases were terminated in 1967. The fee (owned) acreage (101 acres) was disposed of on July 3, 1975 (DA, 1965, July 20) but it still lists in a December 1975 directory as "Barksdale Communications Annex," ILC "AXEM" (USAF, 1975, December 15). I have found no documentation describing the purpose of this site, which is about 6 miles northeast of Daingerfield, north of County Line Road. The site currently shows no trace of any Air Force development or use (Personal visit, 1998).

Barksdale FM Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-21-15 N latitude, 93-34 W longitude)
Layout plans indicate the .276 acre site was leased in 1947 (DAF, 1957, September 17). It was assigned to Barksdale on May 7, 1956 as "Barksdale FM Annex" (FM stands for Fan Marker), was redesignated "Bossier City FM Annex" then "Barksdale Navigation Aid Annex" at unknown dates, then inactivated and declared excess on July 16, 1962 (Mueller, 1982). It lists as "Bossier City Fan Marker Annex," number 1097, on a 1957 map (DAF, 1957, September 17). This site is west of Highway 71 and north of Oil Field Road; I could not discern any trace of the site from Oil Field Road (Attempted personal visit, 1997).

Barksdale Horizontal Light Annexes #1 through #8, Bossier City, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet transcribed from layout maps.)
These eight sites were leased in December 1945 and disposed of by 1956. They were perpetual easements for horizon lights, access roads, and power lines (DA, 1949, June 30). Four were to the south-southeast of the Barksdale runway (probably three lighting sites and one access site), and four were to the north-northwest (probably three lighting sites and one access site). I have found no further information on these sites or their use, but they were apparently for runway approach lights. I have not visited any of these sites and am not aware of their present condition or use.

Barksdale ILS Middle Marker Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-28-45 N latitude, 93-38-50 W longitude)
This facility was acquired on March 7, 1956 as the "Barksdale MM Annex," according to Mueller (1982). Another source says this .13 acre site was leased on July 1, 1958 (DA, 1949, June 30) as the "Barksdale ILS Middle Marker Annex." It was still active on January 1, 1974, having been redesignated "Barksdale ILS Middle Marker Annex" (ILS stands for Instrument Landing System) (Mueller, 1982). The December 15, 1975 USAF Installations Directory lists it as "Barksdale ILS Middle Marker Annex," ILC "AWUN." In 1997, it was still in use, home to the ILS Far Field Monitor for runway 33; the middle marker having been replaced several years ago by newer technology (Personal observation, 1997). The site is situated east of Mike Woods Park, only 375 feet from the main installation boundary (DA, 1958, May 2), and can be plainly seen from the south end of Barksdale’s runway (Personal observation, 1996).

Barksdale Middle Marker Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet determined)
This .51 acre location was leased on September 17, 1943 and the lease terminated on March 31, 1954 (DA, 1949, June 30). The site was fairly close to the northern boundary of Barksdale, just south of Interstate Highway 20, but I have not been able to pinpoint the exact location.

Barksdale Outer Marker Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-34-17 N latitude, 93-42-22 W longitude)
This .23 acre annex was leased on September 17, 1943 and the lease was terminated on March 31, 1954 (DA, 1949, June 30). Current condition and use of this property, formerly accessible via the Barksdale Outer Marker Access Road, are unknown.

Barksdale Outer Marker Access Road, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-34-19 N latitude, 93-43-50 W longitude)
This site, an 8.7-acre perpetual easement, was leased on March 5, 1946 and the lease was terminated on March 31, 1954 (WD, 1946, February 4). This installation provided access to the Barksdale Outer Marker Annex. Current condition and use are unknown.

Barksdale Radio Beacon Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-26-11 N latitude, 93-37-14 W longitude)
Fee acquisition of this 11.25-acre installation (plus a .34 acre easement for an access road) was authorized on August 16, 1943 as the "Barksdale Radio Range Station." It is shown as "Bossier City Radio Beacon Annex," Permanent Installation Number (PIN) "1096" on a 1957 layout drawing (DAF, 1957, September 17). On January 30, 1958 it was renamed "Bossier City Radio Beacon Annex" (DA 1949, March 30) and was soon redesignated "Barksdale Radio Beacon Annex" (Mueller, 1982). After its days as a radio range, it served as the outer marker for the Instrument Landing System (ILS), as indicated by the designation "Outer Marker" on the vicinity map in the September, 1962 Barksdale AFB Master Plan (BAFB, 1962). It lists in 1975 as "Barksdale Radio Beacon Annex," ILC "AWUF" (USAF, 1975, December 15). It was declared excess in approximately 1989 and as of 1997 was awaiting disposal (Personal observation, 1997). It is located east of Highway 71 and just south of Sligo Road, although not clearly visible from that road (Attempted personal visit, 1997).

Barksdale TVOR Annex, Caplis, Louisiana
(32-24 N latitude, 93-35-45 W longitude)
Leased on March 12, 1957, the "Barksdale TVOR Annex" (TVOR stands for Terminal Very High Frequency Omnirange) was assigned to Barksdale AFB on June 17, 1958 (Mueller, 1982). This leased installation consisted of a 3.68 acre exclusive use area, surrounded by 284.82 acres with a "line of sight above 1 degree" clearance restriction, forming a protective clear zone around the antenna. The center of this circle was 7.2 miles from, and on the extended centerline of, Barksdale’s runway 32-14 (DA, 1960, February 4). The Air Force transferred this annex to the Federal Aviation Administration on October 1, 1968 by DAF Special Order GA-37 dated July 9, 1969. It is still in use as the Elmgrove VORTAC (VORTAC stands for Very High Frequency Omnirange Tactical Air Navigation) (Personal flyover, 1996). To see the VORTAC, go south on Hwy 71 about 3 miles past Sligo Road to Caplis. Turn left on Caplis Sligo Road and travel about mile. A white antenna will be visible to the south (Personal visit, 1997).


  MISCELLANEOUS

Barksdale Family Housing Annex, Bossier City, Louisiana
(32-31-52 N latitude, 93-42-50 W longitude)
In April 1941 this appeared on a Bossier City map as "Defence Housing" (sp.) (Tatum, 1941). A February 1945 map prepared by the same engineer showed it as "U.S. Housing Project" (Tatum, 1945). "Barksdale Family Housing Annex" was assigned to Barksdale AFB on April 8, 1957 and was disposed of on November 4, 1960 (Mueller, 1989). It is shown as "Bossier City Family Housing Annex," permanent installation number 1095, 28 acres, on an installation plan which also states it transferred to Barksdale from the National Housing Authority in 1947 (DAF, 1957, September 17). This difference in dates could indicate the site was assigned to Barksdale for logistical support in 1947, but not designated as an Air Force installation until 1957. The relatively short period of assignment indicated by Mueller could indicate the site was attached to Barksdale only for purposes of disposal. More information is needed to determine specifics of use. Located on the south side of Shed Road, north of Texas Avenue, and east of Benton Road, the housing units have long ago been removed. Walbrook Park occupies the southern and eastern parts of the site, but the northwest part (where the housing units stood) is vacant except for bits of abandoned foundations and driveways (Personal visit, 1997).

Barksdale Storage Annex, Coushatta, Louisiana
(Coordinates not yet determined)
The only information I found on this site was in Mueller, 1982. "Barksdale Storage Annex," Coushatta, LA, was assigned on September 1, 1961 and disposed of on November 12, 1964. I have not determined the purpose or exact location of this site.

Barksdale Storage Annex #2, Leary, Texas
(Coordinates not yet determined)
The only information I found on this site was in Mueller, 1982. "Barksdale Storage Annex #2," Leary, Texas was assigned on August 10, 1964 and disposed of on August 20, 1966. I have not determined the purpose or exact location of this site.

Barksdale Storage Annex #3, San Marcos, Texas
(Coordinates not yet determined)
The only information I found on this site was in Mueller, 1982. "Barksdale Storage Annex #3," San Marcos, Texas was assigned on November 17, 1966 and disposed of on December 31, 1969. I have not determined the purpose or exact location of this site.

Lake Charles Air Force Station, Lake Charles, Louisiana
(30-11-05 N latitude, 93-10-30 W longitude)
This radar site served our nation’s air defense system for many years prior to its association with Barksdale AFB. On September 1, 1992 responsibility for accountability and maintenance of "Lake Charles AFS," ILC "MQTF," was transferred to Barksdale from England AFB, Louisiana, by Headquarters Air Combat Command Special Order GC-01 (ACC, 1993, March 2). The radar ceased operation on May 1, 1996 and in late 1997 the radar and tower were removed for use elsewhere. The site is still maintained by Barksdale, pending disposition (Personal visit, 1997).

Matagorda Island Dock Annex, Port O’Connor, Texas
(28-26 N latitude, 96-25 W longitude)
Listed in the December 15, 1975 USAF Installations Directory as "Matagorda Island Dock Annex," ILC "PLPE," assigned to Barksdale AFB (DAF, 1975, December 15). This site was likely assigned to Barksdale for the same time period as Matagorda Island AF Range, as this is the mainland access point for Matagorda Island. This facility is now part of Matagorda Island State Park. It is used by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department much as it was by the Air Force—it houses the boats which transport park service personnel and tourists to and from the island (Personal visit, 1994).

Slack Air Force Depot, Shreveport, Louisiana
(32-25 N latitude, 93-45 W longitude)
Named the "Shreveport Holding & Reconsignment Depot," this installation is visible on a 1945 map of the Barksdale Field area (U.S. Engineer Office, 1945, June 22). It was assigned to ATC and Barksdale AFB on December 1, 1948, then transferred to SAC on October 1, 1949, under the name "Shreveport QM Depot" (QM for Quartermaster) (ATC Index). That was the only document I found assigning the depot to Barksdale AFB. The designation changed from "Shreveport Quartermaster Depot" to "Slack Air Force Depot" on December 14, 1949 by DAF GO 105, same date. It transferred from SAC to Air Materiel Command on April 1, 1954 by DAF GO 28 dated July 13, 1954. Redesignated again, "Slack Storage Site" was disposed of on May 1, 1961 (Mueller, 1982). Situated in south Shreveport, it is now the Slack Industrial Park, with Beaird Industries as the largest tenant. It is just north of Industrial Loop; south of Hwy 3132, and east of I-49. Many of the military warehouses and rail lines still exist near Beaird’s newer facilities (Personal visit, 1997).


  REFERENCES

Air Training Command [ATC Index]. (Various dates). Card file index listing changes in status of installations. (Unpublished, index cards in file box). Randolph Air Force Base, TX. Courtesy of the Office of History and Research, Headquarters, Air Education and Training Command (HQ AETC).

Anonymous [BAFB]. (1962, September). Abbreviated Master Plan, Barksdale Air Force Base. Shreveport, LA: Barksdale Air Force Base. Courtesy of the 8th Air Force Museum, Barksdale AFB, LA.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1948, January 13). General Order 2. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1949, June 23). General Order 42. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1949, July 28). General Order 54. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1949, December 14). General Order 105. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1954, July 13). General Order 28. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1969, July 9). Special Order GA-37. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1975, December 15). Air Force Pamphlet 87-13, Real Property, USAF Installations Directory (Worldwide). Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air Force Historical Research Agency, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force [DAF]. (1992, December 21). Special Order GA-496. Washington, DC: Author. Courtesy of the Air University Library, Maxwell AFB, AL.

Department of the Air Force, Strategic Air Command [DAF]. (1957, September 17). Real Estate Map, Barksdale Air Force Base Off-Base Installations. Barksdale AFB, LA: 2d Civil Engineer Squadron, Engineering Flight.

Department of the Army, Office of the Fort Worth District Engineer, Southwestern Division [DA]. (1965, July 20). Real Estate, Barksdale Communications Annex, Military Reservation. Barksdale AFB, LA: 2d Civil Engineer Squadron, Engineering Flight.

Department of the Army, Office of the Little Rock District Engineer, Southwestern Division [DA]. (1960, February 4 with revisions through 1961, March 29). Real Estate, Barksdale TVOR Annex, Military Reservation. Barksdale AFB, LA: 2d Civil Engineer Squadron, Engineering Flight.

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Tatum, R.L. (1945, February). Map of Bossier City LA. Publisher unknown. Courtesy of the Noel Memorial Library Archives, Map Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport.

U.S. Engineer Office. (1945, June with revisions through 1945, June 22). Barksdale Field, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sonic Bomb Scoring Targets, General Layout. Sheet 2 of 3. Barksdale AFB, LA: 2d Civil Engineer Squadron, Engineering Flight.

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