Loring at Last

Copyright 2019, Scott D. Murdock


This report documents a 17-day road trip my wife Debbie and I made from Colorado to Maine and back. The name of this report refers to this being my third attempt to photograph the former Loring Air Force Base -- I was rained out on two previous visits in 2004 and 2012. This will be a full spectrum report, covering not only military sites but also civilian structures and buildings I documented along the way. To be honest, after a quarter century of exploring former military sites it is getting harder to mount military-only field trips. Also, my interest in architectural and engineering history has expanded to include thin-shell concrete and folded-plate concrete structural forms, both civilian and military, of which several nice examples were on our path. On this trip, one of the civilian buildings is an important predecessor to three of the military buildings, so there is a tie-in between my interests in concrete engineering and military history.

Sunday, 28 July 2019

We headed east out of Denver, taking I-70 through Kansas.

Highway Rest Area (I-70 Eastbound), Ellsworth, Kansas The two picnic shelters at this rest area are thin-shell concrete. Four panels, each a hyperbolic paraboloid surface, are joined together and mounted atop a concrete column. Each panel is higher at the central column than at the outer edge, giving the roof an "umbrella" or "toadstool" shape. The overall dimensions of each shelter is 24 feet by 24 feet.
(Western shelter)
(Western shelter)
(Eastern shelter)
(Eastern shelter)

Highway Rest Area (I-70 Eastbound), Solomon, Kansas The two picnic shelters at this rest area are thin-shell concrete. Four panels, each a hyperbolic paraboloid surface, are joined together and mounted atop a concrete column. Each panel is higher at the central column than at the outer edge, giving the roof an "umbrella" or "toadstool" shape. The overall dimensions of each shelter is 24 feet by 24 feet.
(Western shelter)
(Western shelter)
(Eastern shelter)
(Eastern shelter)

Highway Rest Area (I-70 Eastbound), Junction City, Kansas The two picnic shelters at this rest area are thin-shell concrete. Four panels, each a hyperbolic paraboloid surface, are joined together and mounted atop a concrete column. Each panel is higher at the central column than at the outer edge, giving the roof an "umbrella" or "toadstool" shape. The overall dimensions of each shelter is 24 feet by 24 feet.
(Western shelter)
(Western shelter)
(Eastern shelter)
(Eastern shelter)

Our destination for the night was Independence, Missouri.

Monday, 29 July 2019

From Independence we continued east into Illinois.

Carnegie Library, Louisiana, Missouri Andrew Carnegie provided the grant for this library in 1902.
(General view)
(General view)

Rail Splitter Highway Rest Area (Northbound), Springfield, Illinois This highway rest area toilet building was built in 1964. The roof is composed of four thin-shell concrete "inverted umbrella" structures; each of which is composed of four hyperbolic paraboloid panels mounted on a center column. Each of those four panels meets the column at its lowest point, extending up to form a horizontal ridge.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Detail showing water damage)

Rail Splitter Highway Rest Area (Southbound), Springfield, Illinois This highway rest area toilet building was built in 1964. The roof is composed of four thin-shell concrete "inverted umbrella" structures; each of which is composed of four hyperbolic paraboloid panels mounted on a center column. Each of those four panels meets the column at its lowest point, extending up to form a horizontal ridge.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Detail showing water damage)
(Detail showing water damage)

Lincoln Library Garage, Springfield, Illinois This underground parking garage was completed in 1968. The roof consists of 90 "inverted umbrella" assemblies, each 30 feet by 30 feet and 6 inches thick. The hyperbolic paraboloid thin-shell concrete shells are thicker than usual to support the weight of saturated soil and trees planted above. The architect was E. Wallace Henderson. Structural engineer was Jack Casson of Hanson Engineers.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)

University of Illinois Assembly Hall, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois This massive structure was constructed between 1959 and 1963. The circular, edge-supported dome is 400 feet in diameter, composed of folded-plate concrete segments 3.5" thick. Max Abramovitz of Harrison & Abramovitz was the architect. Edward Cohen of Ammann & Whitney was the structural engineer.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up of external canopy)
(Close-up of external canopy)

We stopped for the night in Greenfield, Indiana.

Tuesday, 30 July 2019

From Greenfield we continued east into Ohio.

Scioto Downs Racetrack, Columbus, Ohio This complex was built in 1960. The grandstand roof consists of five joined, thin-shell concrete inverted umbrella shapes. Each measures 60 feet by 116 feet and is 4 inches thick. Adjoining the grandstand is a large building with a folded-plate concrete roof. Near the grandstand on the other side is a smaller building with a folded-plate roof. Architects were Kellam & Foley. The structural engineer was R.M. Gensert of Gensert, Williams & Associates. Sadly, black netting wraps the underside of the magnificent grandstand roof. This is due to problems with spalling of the concrete, and it suggests that this structure may be demolished soon.
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Grandstand)
(Large folded-plate building)
(Large folded-plate building)
(Large folded-plate building)
(Small folded-plate building)
(Small folded-plate building)
(Small folded-plate building)

After crossing through West Virginia, we headed into Pennsylvania and after a family dinner in Latrobe we stopped in Greensburg.

Wednesday, 31 July 2019

From Greensburg we spent a day in Latrobe visiting with family before heading to nearby Acme and our evening destination.

Duncan House, Polymath Park, Acme Pennsylvania This prefabricated, Usonian house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built by the Marshall Erdman Company. It was erected in Lisle, Illinois, in 1957. In 2007 it was relocated to Acme, Pennsylvania, and carefully reassembled.
(Exterior)
(Exterior)
(Exterior)
(Exterior)
(Exterior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)
(Interior)

It was an interesting place to spend the night.

Thursday, 1 August 2019

From Acme we continued across Pennsylvania.

Hershey Sports Arena, Hershey, Pennsylvania This was the first large-scale thin-shell concrete project in the US, constructed in 1936. Engineer Anton Tedesko of the Roberts & Schaefer Company designed the building, with 3.5 inch thick barrel vaults spanning 222 feet. This was his third thin-shell project in the US, after the first Hayden Planetarium in New York and the temporary dairy barns for Brook Hill Farm at Chicago's Century of Progress World's Fair, both in 1934. With the demolition of the Hayden in 1997, this became the oldest extant thin-shell concrete structure in the US. The aerial view is taken from the Hersheypark ride named the Kissing Tower.
(Aerial view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Detail)
(Detail)

Our destination for the night was Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

Friday, 2 August 2019

From Bethlehem we across New York and Connecticut, and finally into Massachusetts. We stopped in Leominster, which would be temporary base for three nights.

Saturday, 3 August 2019

From Leominster we drove into nearby Fitchburg to check out a building.

Library, Fitchburg, Massachusetts This building is the design of architect Margaret M. Ross. The roof is composed of thin-shell concrete hyperbolic paraboloids, joined together to form inverted umbrella shapes. The appearance of the shells is even more striking inside the building.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)

After that we attended family functions in Hubbardston and South Barre before returning to Leominster for the night.

Sunday, 4 August 2019

From Leominster we headed back to Hubbardston for a family reunion, then back to Leominster.

Monday, 5 August 2019

From Leominster we drove north, crossing New Hampshire on our way into Maine. We headed way up north to Caribou, where we stayed two nights.

Tuesday, 6 August 2019

Debbie took our car on her own adventure (driving US Highway 1 north to its point of origin at Fort Kent, Maine, while I joined Ron, Dave L., Dave D. and Rory for a day of local area Cold War adventure. Dave D. was kind enough to drive us around in his gigantic truck.

Loring Air Force Base (AFB), Limestone, Maine Permanent Installation Number 2283, Installation Location Code NRCH. Construction of Limestone AFB began in 1947. It was activated in 1950, and redesignated Loring AFB on 1 October 1954. Loring was selected for closure by the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure decision and the base closed 30 September 1994. Loring is one of very few Cold War US Air Force airfields that did not have its start during or before World War II. This was my third attempt to photograph this former Strategic Air Command (SAC) Base; prior visits in 2004 and 2012 were rained out. I was delighted to finally see Loring in clear weather!
(Fac 5302 Chapel center)
(Fac 7200 Elevated water storage tank)
(Fac 7200 Elevated water storage tank)
(Fac 7317 Diesel fuel tank)
(Fac 8200 Base operations and control tower)
(Fac 8200 Base operations and control tower)
(Fac 8200 Control tower close-up)
(Fac 8200 Base operations entrance shelter)
(Fac 8261 Engine test cell "Hush house")
(Fac 8261 Engine test cell "Hush house")
(Fac 8261 Engine test cell "Hush house")
(Fac 8261 Engine test cell "Hush house")
(Fac 8262 Support building)
(Fac 8262 Support building)
(Fac 8510 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8510 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8510 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8510 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8514 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8622 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8740 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8744 Maintenance dock)
(Fac 8748 Maintenance dock)

Air Defense Command (ADC) Alert Area and Support Complex The fighter-interceptor alert hangar is the most distinctive structure of this mission grouping, but other supporting facilities were also built. At Loring, the alert hangar is the second-generation design by Strobel and Salzman, with two aircraft bays.
(Fac 8410 Fighter-intercepter alert hangar)
(Fac 8410 Fighter-intercepter alert hangar)
(Fac 8410 Fighter-intercepter alert hangar)
(Fac 8390 Maintenance hangar)
(Fac 8390 Maintenance hangar)
(Fac 8390 Maintenance hangar)
(Fac 8390 Maintenance hangar)
(Fac 8440 Rocket storage and assembly)
(Fac 8440 Rocket storage and assembly)
(Fac 8440 Rocket storage and assembly)
(Fac 8440 Rocket storage and assembly)
(Fac 8440 Rocket storage and assembly)
(Fac 8420 Readiness crew dormitory)
(Fac 8420 Readiness crew dormitory)
(Fac 8430 Building)
(Fac 8430 Building)
(Vehicle storage)
(Sentry house)
(Sentry house)
(Sentry house)

Strategic Air Command Alert Area - Bomber Alert The crew readiness building, commonly called the alert facility or "Molehole," was built in 1960 as the 70-man type designed by the Leo A. Daly Company. The building ceased use as a bomber alert facility in 1967; building 6000 (not documented on this trip) was used instead until the crew readiness building was significantly enlarged in 1983. The large addition was designed by Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc. and Alonzo B. Reed Inc. The master surveillance and control tower was added to the alert aircraft parking area in 1986, the same year facilities 8965 and 8966 were built. The large rolling gate separates the bomber alert area from the end of the runway and was likely constructed in the 1980s. Final use of the crew readiness building for alert force aircrews was in 1991.
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building general view)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building later addition)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building later addition)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building later addition)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building close-up of entryways)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building close-up of entryways)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8970 Crew readiness building interior)
(Fac 8990 Master surveillance and control tower)
(Fac 8990 Master surveillance and control tower)
(Fac 8990 Master surveillance and control tower)
(Fac 8990 Master surveillance and control tower detail of cab)
(View from 40-foot tower)
(View from 40-foot tower)
(View from 40-foot tower)
(View from 40-foot tower)
(Fac 8966 Electrical power building)
(Fac 8966 Electrical power building)
(Fac 8966 Electrical power building)
(Fac 8966 Electrical power building)
(Fac 8965 Entry control building)
(Fac 8965 Entry control building)
(Fac 8965 Entry control building)
(Fac 8965 Entry control building)
(Flight line gate)
(Flight line gate)
(Flight line gate)

Strategic Air Command Alert Area - Tanker Alert A separate parking area (or "pen") was provided for tankers in 1975, along with its own entry control point.
(Tanker alert area entry control building)
(Tanker alert area entry control building)
(Tanker alert area entry control building)
(Tanker alert area entry control building)

Strategic Air Command Alert Area - Alternate Bomber Alert From 1967 to 1983 a different ramp area near base operations was used for alert bombers, along with its own entry control point.
(Alternate bomber alert area entry control building)
(Alternate bomber alert area entry control building)
(Alternate bomber alert area entry control building)

Fac 8280 The massive double-cantilever hangar was a design of the Kuljian Corporation. It was built in numerous examples at many Air Force bases during the 1950s, in differing sizes for both fighter and bomber aircraft. Loring's example is the largest size built, measuring roughly 600 feet by 270 feet to hold up to six B-36 aircraft at one time. The Albert A. Lutz Co., Inc. completed construction of this hangar in 1955.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)

Fac 8250 For me, the highlight of the day was getting a close look at the Very, Very Heavy Bomber hangar, also called the arch hangar. This hangar (and another just like it at Ellsworth AFB) has a thin-shell concrete barrel vault roof spanning 340 feet! This massive hangar was completed in 1949, and was built as a prototype B-36 hangar for Strategic Air Command. After building just two examples, the Air Force chose to go with the double-cantilever hangar (see above) for widespread use. The hangar was 300 feet deep and designed to hold two B-36 bombers. The thin-shell roof thins down to a mere five inches thick between the supporting ribs. Engineer Anton Tedesko led the Roberts and Schaefer Company effort to design this structure. Builders were Lane Construction Corp. and T.W. Cunningham Co., Inc.
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior general view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Exterior close-up view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior general view)
(Interior view of aircraft door)
(Interior view of aircraft door)
(Interior view of aircraft door pocket)
(Interior view of aircraft door pocket showing buttress and arch at the springing line)
(Interior view of aircraft door pocket showing buttress and arch at the springing line)
(Interior view of aircraft door pocket showing buttress and arch at the springing line)
(Interior detail)
(Large addition, Facility 8251, built in 1952)

Caribou Air Force Station, Limestone, Maine Permanent Installation Number 2092. This former storage area is adjacent to Loring Air Force Base. It was activated 1 November 1952, and merged into Loring AFB on 1 July 1962. It is currently a wildlife refuge, and a portion of the site is open to visitors. These structures were built during the period 1952-55.
(Fac 220 Entry control point)
(Fac 220 Entry control point)
(Fac 220 Entry control point)
(General view)
(Fac 232 Armament test shop, assembly)
(Fac 232 Armament test shop, assembly)
(Fac 232 Armament test shop, assembly)
(Fac 232 Armament test shop, assembly)
(Fac 241 Storage igloo)
(Fac 241 Storage igloo)
(Fac 241 Storage igloo)
(Fac 243 Storage igloo)
(Fac 243 Storage igloo)
(Fac 243 Storage igloo)
(Fac 244 Storage igloo)
(Fac 244 Storage igloo)
(Fac 244 Storage igloo)
(Fac 246 Storage igloo)
(Fac 246 Storage igloo)
(Fac 246 Storage igloo)
(Fac 247 Storage igloo)
(Fac 247 Storage igloo)
(Fac 247 Storage igloo)
(Fac 247 Storage igloo)
(Fac 248 Storage igloo)
(Fac 248 Storage igloo)
(Fac 248 Storage igloo)
(Fac 249 Storage igloo)
(Fac 249 Storage igloo)
(Fac 249 Storage igloo)
(Fac 249 Storage igloo)
(Fac 250 Storage igloo)
(Fac 250 Storage igloo)
(Fac 250 Storage igloo)
(Fac 251 Storage igloo)
(Fac 251 Storage igloo)
(Fac 251 Storage igloo)
(Fac 251 Storage igloo)
(Fac 252 Storage igloo)
(Fac 252 Storage igloo)
(Fac 252 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 255 Storage igloo)
(Fac 258 Storage igloo)
(Fac 258 Storage igloo)
(Fac 258 Storage igloo)
(Fac 259 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 259 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 259 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 259 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 260 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 262 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 262 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 262 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 262 Security, sentry house)
(Fac 263 Storage igloo)
(Fac 263 Storage igloo)
(Fac 265 Storage igloo)
(Fac 265 Storage igloo)
(Fac 266 Storage igloo)
(Fac 266 Storage igloo)
(Fac 266 Storage igloo)
(Fac 266 Storage igloo)
(Fac 267 Storage igloo)
(Fac 267 Storage igloo)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 272 Storage, A-Structure)
(Fac 273 Storage igloo)
(Fac 273 Storage igloo)
(Fac 273 Storage igloo)
(Fac 276 Storage igloo)
(Fac 276 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 277 Storage igloo)
(Fac 278 Storage igloo)
(Fac 278 Storage igloo)
(Fac 279 Storage igloo)
(Fac 279 Storage igloo)
(Fac 280 Storage igloo)
(Fac 280 Storage igloo)
(Fac 281 Storage igloo)
(Fac 281 Storage igloo)
(Fac 282 Storage igloo)
(Fac 282 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)
(Fac 284 Storage igloo)

At this point Dave D. and Rory needed to head for home, so Dave D. and I piled into Ron's rental car for an encore to the day's coverage.

Nike Launcher Site L-31L, Limestone, Maine This Nike missile launcher site served the US Army from 1956 to 1962.
(Missile assembly and test building)
(Generator building)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)

Caswell Air Force Station, Caswell, Maine Permanent Installation Number 2202, Installation Location Code DFJT. Construction of this site began in 1950, and it operated until 1980, when it was excessed.
(Radar tower)
(Radar tower)
(Radar tower)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Barracks)
(Barracks)
(Barracks)
(Barracks)

Nike Launcher Site L-13L, Caswell, Maine This Nike missile launcher site served the US Army from 1956 to 1962.
(Missile assembly and test building (L) and generator building (R))
(Missile assembly and test building (L) and generator building (R))
(Generator building)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)
(Enlisted mens barracks and officers quarters)

Loring Communications Annex #3 (Receiver), Limestone, Maine Permanent Installation Number 5367, Installation Location Code NRCQ. This small receiver site is only about one-quarter mile outside of the Loring AFB fence line. It was built in the 1950s and used until 1965, then placed back in use in 1970 for an undetermined time. It was declared excess in 1994 and disposed of in 2001.
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)
(Building)

After a late dinner we settled in for our second night in Caribou.

Wednesday, 7 August 2019

From Caribou we drove south, crossing Massachusetts into Rhode Island. We stopped to photograph one building in Providence.

United States Postal Service Mail Center, Providence, Rhode Island C.R. Maguire and Associates were the architects for this building, which was built in 1960. The thin-shell concrete roof has multiple barrel shells, interconnected to form groined vaults.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)

Our stopping point was nearby Pawtucket.

Thursday, 8 August 2019

From Pawtucket, we drove across Massachusetts into New York. We made one site visit in Schenectady.

General Electric Flight Test Hangar, Schenectady, New York General Electric had this hangar constructed in 1946 and 1947. Roberts and Schaefer were the engineers, so it is probable that Anton Tedesko designed (or oversaw the design of) the thin-shell concrete structure. Corbetta Construction Company was the builder.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)
(Interior close-up)
(Interior close-up)

From there we continued west to Syracuse, meeting up with my friend Glenn for dinner and some exploring.

Onondaga County War Memorial, Syracuse, New York Completed in 1951, the thin-shell concrete roof spans 204 feet and is 3 inches thick. Architects were Edgarton & Edgarton; structural engineers were Ammann & Whitney. From ground level you can only get occasional glimpses of the barrel vault roof, so we found a parking garage to get a better view.
(General view)
(General view)
(Elevated view)
(Elevated view)
(Elevated view)

Manley Field House, Syracuse, New York Charles S. Whitney was the engineer for this 1962 building. The thin-shell concrete roof is composed of 36 precast concrete panels. Unlike the General Electric hangar above, no concrete is visible on the underside of the roof. Rather, an extensive framework allows for lighting and other hung equipment.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Close-up view)
(Close-up view)
(Interior view)
(Interior view)

Regency Towers Apartments, Syracuse, New York We just happened to find this cool building, with its folded-plate concrete entry canopy and walkway.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(Detail)

This was a long day, fun but tiring.

Friday, 9 August 2019

After breakfast with Glenn, we headed west to Niagara Falls. We photographed one building at the airport.

Naval Air Reserve Training Hangar, Niagara Falls, New York Built in approximately 1952 or 1953, this hangar is one of seven built to this design, and is based on the prototype at Naval Air Station Buckley (later, Buckley AFB). The thin-shell concrete barrel arch roof spans 136 feet at the springing line. The buttresses angle inward 14 feet increasing the clear span to 164 feet up to 11 feet 7 1/4 inches above the hangar floor; interior side walls limit the useable width of the hangar bay to 150 feet. The roof shell is 4 inches thick between the supporting ribs. Anton Tedesko of Roberts & Schaefer was the engineer and approved the drawings of the Buckley hangar.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)

We stopped for the night in nearby Cheektowaga.

Saturday, 10 August 2019

From Cheektowaga we continued west, crossing from New York into Pennsylvania and then Ohio. We stopped for the night in Maumee.

Sunday, 11 August 2019

From Maumee we drove west across Indiana and Illinois into Iowa.

Antique Archaeology, Le Claire, Iowa We are fans of the TV program American Pickers, so we couldn't resist stopping at their home base.
(General view)
(Building)
(Building)
(Van)

From Le Claire we continued on to Coralville.

Monday, 12 August 2019

From Coralville we drove across Iowa, making a brief family visit in Glenwood. Partway into Nebraska I attempted some photos of a cool hangar from the highway.

Naval Air Reserve Training Hangar, Lincoln, Nebraska Built in approximately 1952 or 1953, this is another of the seven built, so the thin-shell concrete barrel arch roof spans spans 136 feet at the springing line. The buttresses angle inward 14 feet increasing the clear span to 164 feet up to 11 feet 7 1/4 inches above the hangar floor; interior side walls limit the useable width of the hangar bay to 150 feet. The roof shell is 4 inches thick between the supporting ribs. Anton Tedesko of Roberts & Schaefer was the engineer and approved the drawings of the Buckley hangar. Access to the hangar is limited so I photographed it from a moving car on Interstate 80 over three-quarters of a mile away.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)

Our destination for the final night of the trip was Kearney.

Tuesday, 13 August 2019

From Kearney we drove across the remainder of Nebraska into Colorado. Denver never looked so good! This 17-day trip put 5,574 miles on Debbie's car.


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