Wanderings

Copyright © 2007-2015, Scott D. Murdock
6 Aug 2011 - This page split away from Living on Lowry.
29 Aug 2011 - Added Ellsworth AF Msl Sites D-01 and D-09 SD, and Fort Laramie WY.
30 Nov 2011 - Added Camp Hale CO and Leadville AAFld CO.
8 Oct 2012 - Added Bozeman NG Armory MT, Cut Bank AAFld MT, Malmstrom Recrn Anx MT, and Pablo Comms Site GWEN 655 MT.
26 Jan 2014 - Added Battery Bigelow, Battery Laidley, Fort DeSoto, Mullet Key B&G Rg, Osprey Bmbg Rg, Plant Park Center, and Tampa Bay Hotel FL.
19 Aug 2014 - Added Greeley POW Camp CO.
20 Dec 2015 - Added Cheyenne National Guard Armory WY.


This page is a catchall for various minor adventures that, by themselves, do not warrant individual trip reports.  This page covers the time frame starting in August 2007.  See Variation Authorized for similar material from 1994 through 2004, and Miscellany for similar material from 2005 through July 2007.  Unlike my "normal" trip reports, this one is alphabetical rather than chronological.  This page started as "Living on Lowry," but I decided that Lowry AFB and it's various annexes warranted a separate page. 

Air Force Finance Center, Denver, Colorado (2095, ACYU)

I photographed the administrative building at this former supply depot, at 3800 York Street, back in 2005. At that time I didn't realize that the several large, long warehouses (and at least one small one) had once served as huge offices for finance and accounting technicians. A steam plant flanks the administrative building on one side, and several associated buildings are on the other side. Built as a medical supply depot for the Army in W.W.II, the Air Force used this installation as the Air Force Finance Center from 1951 until 1976. Visited 28 Aug 2010.

Battery Bigelow, Florida

This concrete gun battery, located at 27.6144, 82.7374, held two 3" guns.  The battery is located on Fort DeSoto (see separate entry).  Construction was completed in 1902, and it was named for 1st Lt Aaron Bigelow on 15 May 1903.  The battery was deactivated in 1920.  My visit was on 10 Jan 2014.
(General view)

(Gun emplacement)

(Gun mount)

Battery Laidley, Florida

When construction was completed in Apr 1900, this concrete battery held eight 12" mortars in two bays.  This battery is located on Fort DeSoto (see separate entry), at 27.6155, 82.7359.  Four of the mortars were eventually removed to relieve crowding in the emplacements -- circular repairs in the concrete show their former locations.  The battery was named for Col Theodore T.S. Laidley on 15 May 1903.  The battery was declared surplus on 27 Jun 1931.  These are the only 12" mortars still emplaced in firing positions, in the U.S.  Visited 10 Jan 2014.
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)
(General view)

(General view)

(Generator room)

(Magazine)

(Mortar emplacements #1 and #2)

(Close up of mortar muzzle)

(Data booth for emplacements #1 and #2)

(Mortar emplacements #3 and #4)

(Data booth for emplacements #3 and #4)

Bozeman National Guard Armory, Bozeman, Montana

This armory, located at 45-40-48, 111-02-17, was built at the beginning of W.W.II. It now sits empty, but there are plans to redevelop it into a hotel. Visited 3 September 2012.

Buckley Arctic Training Center, Colorado

I was on (or at least very near) this large training area on my way up to Mount Evans on 9 Jul 2008.  In 1943 and 1944, 34,930 acres of land were used by Buckley Field for arctic training.

Camp George West, Golden, Colorado

Much of this former National Guard camp, at 39-44-35, 105-10-30, is now a correctional facility.  A water tower and warehouses can be seen from outside the fence.  Visited 20 Sep 2008.

Camp Hale, Colorado

This was the Army's high-altitude training camp during W.W.II. The 10th Mountain Division trained here, in the mountains surrounding the built-up portion of the camp. A few structural remnants remain, along with some interpretive signage, and some of the road grid is visible from the adjacent U.S. highway. Centered approximately at 39-26, 106-19, the land is now open to hiking and snowmobiling. Concrete buttresses from a W.W.II field house still stand, as does a small concrete structure, and stonework from an installation gate. The Eagle River was straightened and deepened when the camp was built. Other foundation remains may exist under the snow. Visited 24 Nov 2011.

Cheyenne National Guard Armory, Cheyenne, Wyoming

Cheyenne's first armory, located at 41-08-48, 104-48-54, was built in the mid-1930s. It now houses the Wyoming National Guard Museum. The museum was closed for renovation when I visited, so I will return once it reopens. Visited 3 December 2015.

Colorado Springs Administration Annex #1 - Chidlaw Building, Colorado Springs, Colorado (EDQR)

This property was activated as an annex of Ent AFB on 3 Jun 1974, although it had been in use by ADC since the 1960s.  It transferred to Peterson AFB on 1 Mar 1976, and was disposed of 16 Feb 1988.  It remains in use as a commercial office building, at 38-50-05, 104-47-18. This building served as Air Defense Command Headquarters, after that function outgrew the building on Ent AFB. Revisited on 20 Nov 2010.

Colorado Springs Administration Annex #2 - Burroughs Building, Colorado Springs, Colorado (EDQQ)

Activated under ADC on 3 Jun 1974, this single-building installation was transferred to SAC on 1 Oct 1979. In 1980 it changed from a real property to a programmed installation. Air Force continued until approximately 2007, and the building was for sale when I visited on 18 Oct 2009.

Colorado Springs Administration Annex #16, Colorado Springs, Colorado (5446)

The Air Force used this building, first calling it the USAF Academy Construction Agency. It was renamed on 15 Feb 1961.  I don't know dates of first or final use of this facility by the AF.  Visited 16 Sep 2007.

Cut Bank AAFld, Cut Bank, Montana (3268)

This is now Cut Bank Municipal Airport (CTB), located at 48-36-30, 112-22-30. This was a bomber training base under 2AF during W.W.II. In the mid 1950s, Air Defense Command used Cut Bank Airport, permanent installation number 3268, as an auxiliary airfield for Cut Bank AFS. Logistics support for the airfield was provided by Malmstrom AFB.
(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar)

(Hangar interior)

(Hangar interior)

(Armament Building)

(Armament Building)

(Armament Building)

(Armament Building)

(Recreation Building)

(Recreation Building)

(Recreation Building)

(Recreation Building)

(Elevated water storage tank footings)

(Elevated water storage tank footings)

(Taxiway)

(Taxiway)

(Taxiway)

Don Ce-Sar Hospital, St. Petersburg Beach, Florida

The Don Ce-Sar opened as a luxury hotel in the late 1920s. During W.W.II it was purchased by the U.S. Government and used by the Army Air Forces, primarily as a convalescent hospital. After the war this grand building served as office space for the Veterans Administration and other government agencies until 1969. New owners in 1972 changed the spelling of the name from Don Ce-Sar to Don CeSar (the hotel was originally named for the literary character Don Caesar.) The Don has been extensively remodeled and updated, and is once again a destination for the rich and famous. Visited 12 Jan 2011.

Drew Field, Tampa, Florida

I had searched without luck for any W.W.II buildings on this former AAF field a few years ago. On this visit I did find several concrete building foundations that may date to W.W.II. These were on the east side of the present TPA at the edge of the Drew Park area. Revisited 9 Jan 2011.

Ellsworth AF Missile Site D-01, South Dakota

I visited this site on 21 Aug, after previous visits in 2001 and 2007 (see "Rapid City Maneuvers" and Miscellany" for those visits). This former launch control facility is now part of the Minuteman Missile National Historic Site. Park Ranger Butch Davis met us at the visitor center, and he also led our tour of D-1. My huge disappointment of the trip was that the elevator was out of service, so our tour did not include the underground launch control center. I asked to use the emergency ladder but was denied. Repeatedly. (The elevator was back in service within two days.)
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(Entry gate)

(Entry gate signage)

(Fence with vintage sign)

(Gasoline pump)

(Hard HF transmit antenna)

(Satellite television dish, fuel tank, and Peacekeeper security vehicle)

(Hard HF receive antenna)

(Helipad)

(Hard UHF antenna)

(Hard UHF antenna, helipad in background)

(Launch Control Suport Building)

(Vehicle garage)

(Facility Manager's bedroom/office)

(Sewage lagoons)

(Kitchen)

(Kitchen)

(Kitchen)

(Dayroom and dining area)

(Dayroom and dining area)

(Security Control Center)

(Security Control Center)

(Elevator to right, emergency ladder to left)

(Park Ranger Butch Davis tells me one last time "No Scott, you may NOT climb down the emergency ladder!")

(Emergency generator)

Ellsworth AF Missile Site D-09, South Dakota

I visited this site on 21 Aug 2011, after previous visits in 2001 and 2007 (see "Rapid City Maneuvers" and Miscellany" for those visits). This is now part of the Minuteman Missile National Historic Site. The viewing enclosure added by the National Park Service allows tourists -- and Russian satellites -- to peek inside the silo. Other than that added feature, this launch facility looks very much like it did when its Minuteman II missile was still on alert. 
(General view)
(General view)
(Silo showing viewing enclosure)
(Training missile inside silo)
(Silo door and track)
(Silo door and track)
(Hard Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) antenna)
(Hard UHF antenna)
(Hard UHF antenna)
(Hard UHF antenna)
(Personnel entryway)
(Personnel entryway)
(Personnel entryway)
(Personnel entryway)
(Gate with signage)
(Azimuth marker post, near site)
(Silo door partially open)
(Support building)
(Support building)
(Support building)
(Older outer zone security system radar mast)
(Detail of Improved Minuteman Physical Security System (IMPSS) monopole)
(Detail of IMPSS monopole)

Ent AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado (1374, GBUZ)

The former base is now the United States Olympic Training Center, and although there is much recent construction, several Air Force buildings remain. (Although, it looked like the wooden W.W.II buildings were about to be demolished.) The installation served as Second Air Force headquarters during W.W.II, then Fifteenth Air Force headquarters in the late 1940s. It became Ent AFB in 1949, and eventually closed in the 1970s. Building numbers and uses listed below are from a 1965 base guide. The Combat Operations Center was moved from Ent's Building 4 into the Cheyenne Mountain complex. Visited 18 Sep 2010 and 20 Nov 2010.
(Building 4 - Combat Operations Center)
(Building 4 - Combat Operations Center)
(Building 4 - Combat Operations Center)
(Building 4 - Combat Operations Center)
(Building 4 - East Annex [had been CADC HQ then ADC HQ, pre-war civilian building])
(Building 4 - East Annex [had been CADC HQ then ADC HQ, pre-war civilian building])
(Building 4 - East Annex [had been CADC HQ then ADC HQ, pre-war civilian building])
(Building 4 - East Annex [had been CADC HQ then ADC HQ, pre-war civilian building])
(Building 4 [post-1965 addition])
(Building 4 [post-1965 addition])
(Building 4 [post-1965 addition])
(Building 4 [post-1965 addition])
(Building 5 - North American Air Defense Command Headquarters)
(Building 5 - North American Air Defense Command Headquarters)
(Building 5 - North American Air Defense Command Headquarters)
(Building 5 - North American Air Defense Command Headquarters)
(Building 5 - North American Air Defense Command Headquarters)
(Building 14 - Dining hall)
(Building 14 - Dining hall)
(Building 14 - Dining hall)
(Building 14 - Dining hall)
(Building 83 - Dormitory)
(Building 87 - Dormitory)
(Building 87 - Dormitory)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 23 - Base communications)
(Building 16 - Legal office [built during W.W.II])
(Building 16 - Legal office [built during W.W.II])
(Building 32 - Base finance [built during W.W.II])
(Building 32 - Base finance [built during W.W.II])
(Building 32 - Base finance [built during W.W.II])
(Building 32 - Base finance [built during W.W.II])
(Building 30 - HQ Squadron Section, 4600th Air Base Wing [built during W.W.II])
(Building 30 - HQ Squadron Section, 4600th Air Base Wing [built during W.W.II])
(Building 30 - HQ Squadron Section, 4600th Air Base Wing [built during W.W.II])

Farish Memorial Recreation Area, Woodland Park, Colorado  (6839, WUXS)

The Air Force activated this installation in 1959 to support the near-by United States Air Force Academy. It was enlarged from 160 to 655 acres in 1967. It contains three lakes, with great scenery (including the occasional Air Force sign lurking on the fence). Visited 18 Oct 2009.

Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Denver, Colorado

Originally known as General Hospital No. 21, this hospital was built by the Army at the end of the first world war.  In 1920 it was named Fitzsimons General Hospital.  It closed by direction of the 1995 BRAC process, and some of the Army buildings remain with lots of new construction mixed in.  Visited 20 Oct 2007.  Here is a view of some older buildings, taken from a new building on 1 Apr 2014. 

Fort DeSoto, Florida

This location was first reserved for military purposes in 1849, and Fort DeSoto was established and named on 4 Apr 1900.  Named for Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto, this 842.42 acre fort was a sub-post to nearby Fort Dade.  Part of the land became Mullet Key Bombing and Gunnery Range early during W.W.II (see separate entry).  The fort is located on Mullet Key, at 27-36-55, 82-44-09.  The fort was declared excess on 27 May 1947.  Visited on 10 Jan 2014 (we had hoped to also visit Fort Dade, but the ferry was not running that day due to fog).
(Museum building, reproduction of vintage building)

(Museum display, artifacts from Mullet Key Bombing and Gunnery Range)

Fort Laramie, Wyoming

I visited this site on 22 Aug 2011. This is now the Fort Laramie National Historic Site. This post started as a private fur trading fort, and evolved into an Army fort. The temperature was flirting with 100f, so I didn't wander around as much as I would have liked. 
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(Hospital ruins)

(Quarters known as "Old Bedlam")

(Infantry barracks ruins and 1876 guardhouse)

(Cavalry barracks)

(Cavalry barracks)

(Bakery)

(1866 guardhouse)

(Post administration building ruins)

(Captains quarters)

(Surgeon's quarters on left, Burt House on right)

(Trader's store)

(Officers quarters ruins)

(Officers quarters ruins)

(Pony Express historical marker)

(Pony Express historical marker)

Francis E. Warren AFB, Cheyenne, Wyoming (1298, GHLN)

I visited the base on 4 Sep 2010, and my overnight lodging was in this building. 

Francis E. Warren AF Missile Site #4, Cheyenne, Wyoming

I visited this site on 30 Apr 2009.  The land is now owned by the City of Cheyenne.  For more information see the Belvoir Ranch Master Plan web site.  The only public access is a limited number of City-sponsored tours, so I feel lucky to have had the opportunity to see the site up close.  This former Atlas D missile site is part of the larger Belvoir Ranch property, acquired by Cheyenne in 2003 for future water development and waste facilities development.  The city also hopes to eventually open an interpretive site to share the heritage of the ranch, including Native American, ranching, and railroad history as well as this first-generation ICBM site.  My thanks to Chuck Lanham for showing me around the site!
(General view of the site looking south from I-80)
(Former location of Gate House & Vehicle Storage Building)
(Diesel Storage Tank (right) and Water Storage Tank (left))
(Power & Pump House and Water Storage Tank)
(Power & Pump House interior)   
(Launch Operations Building entryway)
(Launch Operations Building and Track Antenna)
(Track Antenna)
(Looking into Track Antenna structure from inside Launch Operations Building)
(Additional antenna mount inside Launch Operations Building)
(Additional antenna mount inside Launch Operations Building)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building upper level interior)
(Launch Operations Building stairwell)
(Launch Operations Building lower level interior)
(Launch Operations Building lower level interior)
(Launch Operations Building lower level interior)
(Launch Operations Building lower level interior)
(Launch Operations Building lower level interior)
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))
(Launch & Service Building (1 of 3, west))   
(Launch & Service Building (2 of 3, center))
(Launch & Service Building (2 of 3, center))
(Launch & Service Building (2 of 3, center))
(Launch & Service Building (2 of 3, center))
(Launch & Service Building (2 of 3, center))
(Launch & Service Building (3 of 3, east))
(Launch & Service Building (3 of 3, east))   
(Launch & Service Building (3 of 3, east))
(Launch & Service Building (3 of 3, east))
(Launch & Service Building (3 of 3, east))
(Microwave Building)
(Remote Rate Antenna Building (1 of 2, southwest))
(Remote Rate Antenna Building (1 of 2, southwest))
(Remote Rate Antenna Building (2 of 2, northeast))
(Location of former Bore Site Tower)
(Storage Building and Segregated Magazine)
(Storage Building)
(Segregated Magazine)
(Water Well Building (1 of 3, northwest))
(Water Well Building (2 of 3, center))
(Water Well Building (3 of 3, southeast))
        

Francis E. Warren AF Missile Site #6, Wyoming

I visited this site on 14 May 2011, after a previous visit in 2005. 
(Vintage restricted area sign)

(Parking area)

(Missile entrance door)

(Missile entrance door)

(Topside features)

(Topside features)

(Topside features)

(Topside features)
(Topside features)

(Topside features)
(Topside features)
(Topside features)

(Missile exit door)

(Missile exit door)

(Missile exit door)

(Missile exit door)

(Exhaust door)

(Exhaust door)

(Exhaust door)

(Cable marker)

(Spray pond)

(Wind sock frame)

(Water system building)

Fort Morgan State Armory, Colorado

I stumbled on this one by chance while cruising through Fort Morgan.  It's at 40-15-13, 103-48-00.  Visited 25 Jan 2009.

Greeley POW Camp, Colorado

I visited this site on 17 Aug 2014, in the company of my old pal Ron Plante.  This camp held mostly German prisoners during W.W.II, and was declared surplus 1 Dec 1945.  The gateposts, though original, have been relocated.  They are still on the property of the former camp, at the southwest corner of the 291 acre site. 
(General view of vintage gateposts)

(General view of vintage gateposts)

(Interpretive signage)

(Interpretive signage)

(Interpretive signage)

(Interpretive signage)

Hendricks Field, Florida

I revisited Hendricks Field in Jan 2011, adding a few new photos since my 2007 visit.

Leadville Army Air Field, Colorado

This airfield supported activities at nearby Camp Hale. It was not built-up in typical W.W.II fashion that we expect to find of a designated "Army Air Field." Runways were unpaved, and supporting construction seems to have been minimal. I looked for the location, 39-16-45, 106-19-44, based on information on the Airfields Database web site. I first viewed the area to the northwest, over a fence at the end of Aspen Drive. Then I looked to the southwest from U.S. Highway 24. The large, open area in the background was probably the site of the airfield.  Visited 24 Nov 2011.

Loveland State Armory, Colorado

Since I brake for National Guard armories, I though I would share this state armory with you.  It's located at 40-23-28, 105-04-25.  It was built in 1926 by the State of Colorado Military Board.  Visited 7 Sep 2008.

Malmstrom Recreation Annex, Montana (8106, NZQB)

I visited this former recreation area, located at 48-46-49, 113-24-45, on 5 September 2012. This annex supported Malmstrom AFB from sometime before 1967, until it was declared excess on 12 July 1994. It was disposed of by the USAF on 5 June 1997.  
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

(View of entrance looking onto property)

(View of entrance looking off property)

(Boat ramp)

(Boat ramp)

(Boat ramp)

(Facility 7)

(Facility 7 with adjacent tank)

(Building foundation)

(Building foundation)

(Electric poles)

(Tank adjacent to Facility 7)

(Camper hookups)

(Bench)

(Bench)

(Tripping hazard)

Minot AFB, North Dakota (3346, QJVF)

I visited Minot on business in Feb 2009.  No photos since it is an active base.

Minot AF Missile Site #O-01, North Dakota (9065, QKDP)

I toured this Minuteman III Missile Alert Facility in Feb 2009.  No photos since it is an active site.

Minot International Airport, North Dakota

I revisited this airport in Feb 2009.  This field was improved early in W.W.II under DLAND, and had Navy use during the war, when it was known as Port 'o Minot. No photos, no wartime buildings or structures were visible.

Mountain Home AFB, Idaho (2331, QYZH)

Visited 24 May 2009.  No photos, since this is an active base.

Mountain Home AF Missile Site #1, Idaho (7774)

Visited 24 May 2009.  Now a disposal facility, the original entry gate stands.  Two concrete features are visible from outside the fence, especially from the higher ground just east of the site.

Mountain Home AF Missile Site #2, Idaho (7775)

Visited 24 May 2009.  The Titan I silos are either behind or under this area of elevated earth.

Mountain Home AF Missile Site #3, Idaho (6882)

Visited 24 May 2009.  I didn't see any distinctive features from the gate of this site.

Mullet Key Bombing & Gunnery Range, Florida

Lands formerly part of Fort DeSoto (see separate entry) were reacquired by the War Department in 1942, as a bombing and gunnery range for MacDill Field.  The 716.89 acre range was transferred to the Department of Interior on 9 Aug 1948.  We drove over the former range (which occupied most of Mullet Key) on our way to Fort DeSoto. The range was centered at approximately 27-37-45, 82-43-03.  Some artifacts from the range are displayed in the museum at Fort DeSoto.

Osprey Practice Bombing Range, Florida

The War Department leased 5,029.83 acres as a bombing range for Sarasota AAFld early during W.W.II.  The range was declared surplus on 11 Feb 1946, and the leases terminated soon after.  We drove over the range property, centered at approximately 27-11-25, 82-26-20, on Interstate 75 as we drove from Tampa to Cape Coral and back on 13 Jan 2014.

Pablo Communications Site GWEN 655, Montana (SRQS)

A standard Ground Wave Emergency Network (GWEN) relay node site with 299' tower, this one is located at 47-39-47, 114-06-53. Also known by the name Ronan, this site was used by the USAF from the mid 1980s until it was declared excess 27 August 1999. It was disposed of on 20 December 1999.

Plant Park Center, Florida

The AAF leased 50 acres of Plant Park in May 1941, as a sub-base of MacDill Field.  The land is centered at approximately 27-56-48, 82-27-47.  It served as a replacement center, and was sometimes called Plant Field.  The lease was cancelled on 30 Sep 1945.  I visited on 11 Jan 2014, thanks to research help from Mark Morgan.
(General view)
(General view)
(Cannon on display)

Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado

Built during W.W.II, this was a Chemical Warfare Service facility.  Now the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, centered on 39-50, 104-51, it was temporarily closed to visitors when I visited on 25 Nov 2007. I went back on 20 and 21 Sep 2008 to explore.  The elevated water storage tanks seen a year ago had since been demolished.  The current visitor center is said to be the former arsenal officers club.  An electrical substation could be seen, also this farmhouse that pre-dates the arsenal, and two water system buildings.  One ammunition storage igloo was visible from one of the roads.  A vintage map displayed in the visitor center shows the former layout of the arsenal.

Stapleton Airport, Denver, Colorado

During W.W.II, this airport was known as Denver Municipal Airport or Stapleton Airport.  It served the adjacent AAF Modification Center #13, and hosted various AAF units and activities.  After the war it prospered as Denver's primary airport.  It shut down in the 1990s, and the property has been extensively redeveloped.  I don't believe any W.W.II structures stand, and the only obvious remnants of the commercial airport are a parking garage and the control tower building.  The airport was quite large, and the present I-70 highway cuts right across a former runway. The control tower is south of I-70 at 39-45-38, 104-53-31. The tower is visible from the former Lowry AFB. Visited 25 Nov 2007.

Steve Canyon Statue, Idaho Springs, Colorado

This is for my historian pals who are fans of the Steve Canyon comic strips and television show.  Visited 12 July 2009.  One marker states "Erected by the people of Idaho Springs July 8, 1950 through the efforts of the Idaho Springs Junior Chamber of Commerce."  Another marker, also dated July 1950, reads in part "This statue is dedicated to all airmen who wore the uniform of the armed forces of the United States in time of conflict, and who stand ready in the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard to fly again in defense of their country, should the need arise."

Tampa Bay Hotel, Florida

This grand old hotel was never owned or controlled by the military, but it did serve as a planning headquarters and staging base for several months during the Spanish American War.  It is adjacent to Plant Park (see separate entry).  The hotel is located at 27-56-48, 82-27-51.  Visited 11 Jan 2014. 
(General view)

(General view)

(General view)

The Field Air Inspector, Colorado Springs, Colorado

During W.W.II, this Army Air Forces agency occupied office space at 121 East Pikes Peak Avenue. If the local addresses have remained the same, that would be this building at the corner of the street. Formerly the Mining Exchange Building, this was a bank until recently. Now it appears to be under preparations for either remodeling or demolition. Visited 18 Oct 2009.

United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado (5000, XQPZ)

On 13 Mar 2010 we visited the Academy to check out the visitor center and the chapel. On the drive in, we had a good distant view of the academic complex. As we got closer I appreciated the contrast of other buildings near the chapel. The chapel itself is a masterpiece. From the Ackerman Overlook along I-25, you can see the USAFA flight line, including the control tower.


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